Global analysis of protein-RNA interactions in SARS-CoV-2 infected cells reveals key regulators of infection

0 views • Nov 5, 2021
0
Save
Cite
Share

Author(s)

Author Name

Wael Kamel

Published 1 Project

Microbiology

Marko Noerenberg

Published 1 Project

Microbiology

Berati Cerikan

Honglin Chen

Published 1 Project

Microbiology

Aino I. Järvelin

Published 1 Project

Microbiology

Mohamed Kammoun

Published 1 Project

Microbiology

Jeff Lee

Published 1 Project

Microbiology

Ni Shuai

Published 1 Project

Microbiology

Manuel Garcia-Moreno

Published 1 Project

Microbiology

Anna Andrejeva

Published 1 Project

Microbiology

Michael J. Deery

Published 1 Project

Microbiology

Uploader

Mirko Cortese

Michael L. Knight

Published 1 Project

Microbiology

Kathryn Susan Lilley

Published 1 Project

Microbiology

Javier Martinez

Published 1 Project

Microbiology

Ilan Davis

Published 1 Project

Microbiology

Shabaz Mohammed

Published 1 Project

Microbiology

Alfredo Castello

Published 1 Project

Microbiology

Add New Author

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) causes COVID-19. SARS-CoV-2 relies on cellular RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) to replicate and spread, although which RBPs control SARS-CoV-2 infection remains largely unknown. Here, we employ a multi-omic approach to identify systematically and comprehensively which cellular and viral RBPs are involved in SARS-CoV-2 infection. We reveal that the cellular RNA-bound proteome is remodelled upon SARS-CoV-2 infection, having widespread effects on RNA metabolic pathways, non-canonical RBPs and antiviral factors. Moreover, we apply a new method to identify the proteins that directly interact with viral RNA, uncovering dozens of cellular RBPs and eight viral proteins. Amongst them, several components of the tRNA ligase complex, which we show regulate SARS-CoV-2 infection. Furthermore, we discover that available drugs targeting host RBPs that interact with SARS-CoV-2 RNA inhibit infection. Collectively, our results uncover a new universe of host-virus interactions with potential for new antiviral therapies against COVID-19.

Microbiology
Microbiology 111 Projects